rules

 

Age Divisions

A dancers age is defined as of December 31, 2014.

Average age of a duet/trio, group, large group, line, extended line, and production is calculated by summing the ages of all dancers, dividing by the number of dancers in the routine, and dropping the decimal.

Mini: 9 & under
Junior: 10-12
Intermediate: 13-15
Senior: 16-19
Adult: 20 & up


Categories

Number of Dancers Time Limit Guidelines
Solo 1 2.5 minute maximum
Duet/Trio 2 or 3 3.0 minute maximum
Group 4-9 3.5 minute maximum
Large Group 10-15 3.5 minute maximum
Line 16-20 3.5 minute maximum
Extended Line 21+ 3.5 minute maximum
Production Unlimited 8.0 minute maximum
Routines that exceed the Time Limit Guidelines are subject to a deduction.

Classifications

Solo Duet/Trio Group, Large Group, Line & Extended Line
NoviceThe average age for a Novice routine cannot exceed 15 years.
  • A dancer that has never competed in a solo category in ANY discipline
  • A dancer that has competed in a duet/trio, group, large group, line or extended line is eligible to compete in the NOVICE solo category
  • Dancers that have never competed in a solo or duet/trio category in ANY discipline
  • Dancers that have competed in a group, large group, line or extended line are eligible to compete in the NOVICE duet/trio category
  • Dancers in the duet/trio must be 100% NOVICE
  • Dancers in the group, large group, line or extended line must be 75% NOVICE
Pre-Competitive
  • A dancer that has never competed in a competitive solo category
  • Dancer must train 5 or less hours per week
  • Dancers that have never competed in a competitive solo or duet/trio category
  • Dancers must train 5 or less hours per week
  • Dancers in the duet/trio must be 100% PRE-COMPETITIVE
  • Dancers in the group, large group, line or extended line must be 75% PRE-COMPETITIVE
  • A dancer that competes in a PRE-COMPETITIVE group, large group, line or extended line is eligible to compete in the competitive category
Competitive
  • Any dancer that trains more than 5 hours per week
Professional
  • Any dancer that receives financial compensation or gain from instructing, choreographing and/or performing in the dance industry

Dance Disciplines

Acrobatics: A routine that combines 50% dance and 50% gymnastic components. Routines in an acrobatic category may contain an unlimited number of acrobatic tricks such as but not limited to: balances, stands, aerials, tumbling lines, etc.

Ballet: A routine that is characterized by grace, precision of movement, classical technical skills, and formal gestures. Both classical ballet and character ballet will compete under this dance discipline.

Contemporary/Modern: A routine that does not embody a specific dance technique. This routine focuses on but is not limited to breath, contract and release, spiral, fall and recovery, etc.. No acrobatic tricks are permitted, will result in score deductions.

Hip-Hop: A routine that is danced to urban music and must primarily contain street style and technique. No head balances are permitted, will result in disqualification.*

Jazz: A routine that focuses on ballet technique, coordination and style with a specific emphasis on turns, jumps, and jazz technique sequences. No acrobatic tricks are permitted, will result in score deductions.

Lyrical: A routine that fuses ballet and jazz technique while interpreting music, lyrics, and emotions. No acrobatic tricks are permitted, will result in score deductions.

Musical Theatre: A routine that combines dance movements with acting and stage skills. Facial expressions and body movements are used to portray different characters and story lines.

Open: A routine that does not fulfill the criteria of the defined dance disciplines or is a combination of two or more dance disciplines.*

Pointe: A routine that is characterized by grace, precision of movement, classical technical skills, and formal gestures. Routine must be performed in pointe shoes.

Production: A routine that contains a common theme or storyline. Use of any dance discipline is permitted. No restrictions on acrobatic tricks.

Song & Dance: A routine that combines 50% vocals and 50% dance movement. Routine must be performed without the use of lead background vocals.

Tap: A routine that contains progressive and intricate tap steps and rhythmic combinations with an emphasis on technique and quality of sound. Routine must be performed in tap shoes and without the use of pre-recorded tap sounds.

* Routines cannot contain more than 5 acrobatic tricks. An acrobatic trick is defined as a movement in which the dancer completes a 360-degree rotation OR when a dancers hips pass over the head EXCLUDING entering/exiting lifts. A tumbling line performed by a single dancer is considered 1 acrobatic trick.